Abstraction

My first private gallery show in October was an enjoyable experience, I did sell a few prints, always a nice thing, and response to the exhibition was positive. I watched as people viewed my work and I came away with a few impressions. The display of the prints and the lighting was right, the mix of large format and smaller images worked well, both sizes sold. The negative I drew was  there was no connecting thread to the exhibit. The variety of subjects was diffused. There were travel, architectural, landscape and street images. This would be good as a retrospective with the photographs grouped into categories, but that would require many more photographs than I had ready and a much larger viewing space. It could not be a private showing in my residence gallery. With that in mind I am taking a different approach to my next exhibition.

Macro photography has been an interest of mine for many years. There is something about shooting up close that takes an element of a subject and elevates it.  While all of my photographs are composed with color, shape, and light, macro photographs take those characteristics to a more intense space. Interestingly, the larger the print of the macro image, the more abstract it becomes. OK, this is one of those cases where even 1,000 words would fail me, so …

click on the image for largest display

 Unlike other subjects, the image out of the camera is the start of the process, akin to a painter’s gesso on a canvas. I use the image as a base, using multiple exposure, compositing, and color manipulation for the end print. My goal is to produce 12 large format photographs for my next show in the spring. 

Have a Joyful Thanksgiving! 

- Aboud